Friday, May 22, 2015

Wine & Food of the Giro 2015 Stage 13: Bussola Ca' del Laito & Mostarda

Montecchio Maggiore - Jesolo 153 KM - Flat

Montecchio Maggiore is a town in the province of Vicenza, Veneto. It is located approximately 12 kilometers west of Vicenza and 43 km east of Verona. Two castles are claimed to be the inspiration for the Romeo and Juliet legend: "The first castle is the Castello della Villa, or Romeo’s Castle, built by Cangrande II della Scala in 1354 and dismantled by the Venetians in 1514. What remains are the perimeter wall with the donjon and the tower, which are the background of theatre performances and summer events. At a distance of few hundred meters, a little above, we find the Castello della Bella Guardia, or Juliet’s Castle, more spectacular because its reconstruction allowed the builders, among other things, to place a restaurant inside."

Jesolo: The tourist website tells me that first information about Jesolo as touristic centre go back to the end of the 19th Century when the first bathing establishment was opened on the beach in front of Piazza Marconi. After the Great War the touristic activity grew quickly and villas, holiday camps and hotels were build. In 1937 there were in Jesolo 47 licences of rooms for rent, 24 public facilities and 4 season hotels. 

The stage: Should be a day for the sprinters and again, it rains. The break of the day consists of Zabel, Pineau and Frapporti. With about one hundred kilometers to go, they are forced to stop at a railway crossing. Behind, the peloton is slowed to allow them to regain their gap. 

 

Meanwhile, I contemplate the Giro Twitter feeds use of emjois:



Fifty kilometers to go and the gap was under a minute. The peloton, of course, wants to catch the break. But if they catch them too early, there will be other escape attempts, so often on stages like this, they let them dangle for as long as possible. Usually, they get the timing right, though as we have seen several times already in this Giro, they mistime things.
On Bein, Kirby began discussing the drop in the local stork population, which is apparently dropping, because there are fewer chimneys for them to nest on. So yes, a quiet stage so far.  

Seventeen kilometers to go and the break was reeled in. It looked like things were set up for a sprint finish, until a caduta, just outside the three kilometer point. Among those down, Contador. Porte was also involved and because it was outside the three kilometer point, they would lose time. They both finished the stage on bikes borrowed from teammates.
Ahead there would be a sprint, but more importantly, Contador lost pink. The time trial tomorrow should be very interesting.

Stage:
 

GC: 
 

Wine: Bussola Ca' del Laito Valpolicella Ripasso Superiore

From the importer:  

Varietal notes: Corvina, Corvinone, Rondinella, Molinara and others.
Vineyard: Sourced from the Ca' del Laito vineyard. 380-400m in elevation.
Orientation: Southwest.
Soil: Clay.
Viticulture: Work in the vineyard is measured by the months and the seasons. In order to avoid excessive impoverishment of the lands, the various soils are periodically analysed and a programme of interventions with organic fertilizers is drawn up.
Vinification: The grapes were crushed towards the middle of October and fermentation was initiated immediately via inoculation of selected yeasts. Following a fermentation of 10 days at ambient temperature the wine was racked with a residual sugar of 20 g/l. It was then, after another 10 days, racked again off the gross deposit. In March 90% of the wine underwent a week-long refermentation on skins of the Amarone.
Aging: IIt was then racked again, assembled with the remaining 10% and placed in 700-litre second-passage tonneaux of Styrian oak. After 17 months in wood it was assembled in a single mass, undergoing a light fining with egg-whites. Normally it is allowed to age for three months before release onto the market.
Production: 15,000 bottles produced.
Notes: Ca’del Laito was a place-name for a vineyard that straddles the ridge above Quintarelli. Tommaso purchased the vineyard (and the little workhouse there) from Masi in ~2002.

I say : Deep red, full but not heavy. Black currants, balsamic and  cherries, nice acid on the finish. Even better on day two. I liked this much more than I had expected to. 

Food: Winter Fruit Mostarda from Preserving by the Pint
A canning project, though you could easily make this and store it in the fridge if you do not want to water bath process. 

What is mostarda? I like this quote from Saveur:



Mostarda is not mustard. It is not sweet or acidic, not salty or spicy—at least, it's none of those things alone. It is made mostly of fruit, but is neither jelly nor jam nor dessert. It is closest, maybe, to a relish … but what a relish! It's confident stuff, best served with meats—its traditional counterpart is bollito misto, an assortment of boiled cuts—or cheeses that can take its sharpness. I ate my first bites of mostarda in the Italian town of Sant'Ambrogio di Valpolicella, spooned over milky Monte Veronese cheese. I'll never forget its delicious bite. It's a condiment that makes a meal. —Tamar Adler, author of An Everlasting Meal (Scribner, 2011)

This version I made includes apples, pears, and dried cherries. But given that it is stone fruit season, you might try this recipe, from the same author. 

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Wine & Food of the Giro 2015 Stage 12: Alanera Rosso Veronese & Asiago



Imola - Vicenza (Monte Berico)  190 KM - Medium Mountain


Unesco tells me that "Founded in the 2nd century B.C. in northern Italy, Vicenza prospered under Venetian rule from the early 15th to the end of the 18th century. The work of Andrea Palladio (1508–80), based on a detailed study of classical Roman architecture, gives the city its unique appearance.
Andrea Palladio (1508-80) was profoundly influenced by his study of the surviving monuments of classical Rome and of the works of Vitruvius. For Vicenza he created both public (Basilica, Loggia del Capitaniato, Teatro Olimpico) and private buildings. A total of 26 individual buildings or parts of buildings known to have been designed or reconstructed by Palladio or attributed to him make up the World Heritage site - 23 in the city itself and three villas in its immediate environs. The palazzi or town houses were fitted into the urban texture of the medieval city, creating picturesque ensembles and continuous street facades in which the Veneto Gothic style combines with Palladio's articulated classicism. These urban compositions closely related to theatre design, which link reality and make-believe, are unique to Vicenza. A similar approach to composition is shown by the location of the suburban villa known as La Rotonda, as seen from the Villa Cricoli."

The stage: Rain again today. The break of the day contains Gretsch (AG2R) Appollonio (Androni) Barbin (Bariani) Elissonde (FdJ) and Van der Lijke (Lotto NL). With one hundred kilometers to go, they had about 1:30. The bunch is in a hurry today.
 

Seventy kilometers to go and the gap was around one minute. The weather was just awful. 
 





Thirty kilometers to go and he was caught. Lots of riders were being dropped off the back as they climbed. A little over twenty seven kilometers to go and Contador went to the front to pick up the pace. Caduta! Among those down, Simon Gerrans, one of the favorites for the stage. Ouch, some bad bike handling by Geniez as he almost hits both a child and a dog. Lots of slipping and sliding now. with lots of small groups forming.

Ten kilometers to go and Pellizottii was in front by under twenty seconds. 
I laughed:

A bit more than five kilometers to go and Kangert had caught Pellizotti, but their lead was small. Four kilometers to go and they had eigthteen seconds. Two kilometers to go, BMC was on the front for Gilbert, but the duo out front had thirty seconds. One kilometer, twenty one seconds. Gaps were forming behind as they closed in. And the work by BMC paid off: Gilbert! Plus, bonus seconds for Contador.

Stage: Philippe Gilbert
 

GC:
1 CONTADOR VELASCO Alberto TCS 51 h 17 m 6 s
2 ARU Fabio AST + 17 s
3 LANDA Mikel AST + 55 s
4 CATALDO Dario AST + 1 m 30 s
5 KREUZIGER Roman TCS + 1 m 55 s
6 URAN Rigoberto EQS + 2 m 18 s
7 VISCONTI Giovanni MOV + 2 m 21 s
8 CARUSO Damiano BMC + 2 m 28 s
9 AMADOR BAKKAZAKOVA Andrey MOV + 2 m 38 s
10 KONIG Leopold SKY + 2 m 44 s




Wine: Alanera Rosso Veronese IGT 2012
Sample from Winebow SRP $20.00

Alanera translates as "black wing," a reference to the raven, "corvino" in Italian, and an homage to the Valpolicella region's treasured indigenous grape, "Corvina".  

From the importer : The Zenato winery possesses a strong link to the richness of its local history and culture, and continues to develop this connection today. The estate is based in a territory that surrounds Lake Garda, with an extraordinary microclimate that allows for an optimal growing season. Cherishing a ‘frank and simple’ approach to life, Zenato is committed to producing affordable wine of exceptional quality. With a passion for the land and a dedication to vigorous research, innovation and quality improvement, Sergio Zenato strived to eclipse past results. He crafted wines that are known for their quality and consistency.
Founded in 1960 by Sergio and Carla Zenato, the Zenato winery was originally based on the production of quality wines from an indigenous varietal, Trebbiano di Lugana. Over time, the winery has been passed to Sergio and Carla’s children, who have maintained and expanded upon this vision. Their daughter Nadia currently handles the marketing and promotional activity for the company, while their son Alberto oversees all aspects of production, from the growing of the vines to the completion of the bottling process. Zenato has also explored another important area of Italian wine production — Valpolicella. It is here that they have dedicated endless efforts to the improvement and success of Amarone production, a wine of noble attributes and prestige.

I say: Oh reds of Northern Italy, I am very fond of you. Plum and spices with enough acidity to balance the fruit and tannins.  Reading the tasting notes online, I was worried that this would be bigger than I like. But once again, Melissa Sutherland has steered me to a wine I like.




Food: Asiago
Did I mention that there would be a lot of cheese?
From the Asiago Consortium:
In the Asiago Plateau, from which Asiago cheese takes its name, a tasty cheese has been produced ever since the year 1000. Initially sheep’s milk was used, but from the 1500s, with the gradual increase of cattle farming on the plateau, cow’s milk became the raw material used. The cheese making technique developed, and, during the early seventeenth century, production expanded into the neighbouring areas of the Asiago Plateau: the foothills, the surrounding plains and the nearby Alpine huts of Trentino. The oldest version of Asiago, most faithful to the traditions of the plateau’s cheese makers and with the fullest, most intense flavour, is the Seasoned cheese. In the early twentieth century, Fresh Asiago was born from the traditions of the DOP region combined with innovative cheese making technology. The flavour of this cheese, sweet and mild, has led to its international popularity.



n the Asiago Plateau, from which Asiago cheese takes its name, a tasty cheese has been produced ever since the year 1000.
Initially sheep’s milk was used, but from the 1500s, with the gradual increase of cattle farming on the plateau, cow’s milk became the raw material used.
The cheese making technique developed, and, during the early seventeenth century, production expanded into the neighbouring areas of the Asiago Plateau: the foothills, the surrounding plains and the nearby Alpine huts of Trentino.
The oldest version of Asiago, most faithful to the traditions of the plateau’s cheese makers and with the fullest, most intense flavour, is the Seasoned cheese.
In the early twentieth century, Fresh Asiago was born from the traditions of the DOP region combined with innovative cheese making technology. The flavour of this cheese, sweet and mild, has led to its international popularity. - See more at: http://www.asiagocheese.it/en/cheese/history-of-asiago/#sthash.NaNaHKAa.dpuf
Both Fresh and Aged Asiago are produced in an area reaching from the irrigated fields of the Po Valley to the hills of the Asiago Plateau and Trentino.
The area from which milk is obtained and in which Asiago DOP cheese is produced comprises four provinces: Vicenza, Trento and part of Padua and Treviso.
This consists of the area in which Asiago cheese was originally born, the Asiago Plateau, and of the surrounding territories to which production of this cheese spread.
Asiago cheese that is produced entirely at an altitude above 600 metres and with milk from farms within this area may also bear the distinction “Product of the Mountain”.
Only Asiago cheese produced within this area is authentic Asiago DOP. - See more at: http://www.asiagocheese.it/en/cheese/where-asiago-is-produced/#sthash.Z7t4YKr8.dpuf
n the Asiago Plateau, from which Asiago cheese takes its name, a tasty cheese has been produced ever since the year 1000.
Initially sheep’s milk was used, but from the 1500s, with the gradual increase of cattle farming on the plateau, cow’s milk became the raw material used.
The cheese making technique developed, and, during the early seventeenth century, production expanded into the neighbouring areas of the Asiago Plateau: the foothills, the surrounding plains and the nearby Alpine huts of Trentino.
The oldest version of Asiago, most faithful to the traditions of the plateau’s cheese makers and with the fullest, most intense flavour, is the Seasoned cheese.
In the early twentieth century, Fresh Asiago was born from the traditions of the DOP region combined with innovative cheese making technology. The flavour of this cheese, sweet and mild, has led to its international popularity. - See more at: http://www.asiagocheese.it/en/cheese/history-of-asiago/#sthash.NaNaHKAa.dpuf
n the Asiago Plateau, from which Asiago cheese takes its name, a tasty cheese has been produced ever since the year 1000.
Initially sheep’s milk was used, but from the 1500s, with the gradual increase of cattle farming on the plateau, cow’s milk became the raw material used.
The cheese making technique developed, and, during the early seventeenth century, production expanded into the neighbouring areas of the Asiago Plateau: the foothills, the surrounding plains and the nearby Alpine huts of Trentino.
The oldest version of Asiago, most faithful to the traditions of the plateau’s cheese makers and with the fullest, most intense flavour, is the Seasoned cheese.
In the early twentieth century, Fresh Asiago was born from the traditions of the DOP region combined with innovative cheese making technology. The flavour of this cheese, sweet and mild, has led to its international popularity. - See more at: http://www.asiagocheese.it/en/cheese/history-of-asiago/#sthash.NaNaHKAa.dpuf
n the Asiago Plateau, from which Asiago cheese takes its name, a tasty cheese has been produced ever since the year 1000.
Initially sheep’s milk was used, but from the 1500s, with the gradual increase of cattle farming on the plateau, cow’s milk became the raw material used.
The cheese making technique developed, and, during the early seventeenth century, production expanded into the neighbouring areas of the Asiago Plateau: the foothills, the surrounding plains and the nearby Alpine huts of Trentino.
The oldest version of Asiago, most faithful to the traditions of the plateau’s cheese makers and with the fullest, most intense flavour, is the Seasoned cheese.
In the early twentieth century, Fresh Asiago was born from the traditions of the DOP region combined with innovative cheese making technology. The flavour of this cheese, sweet and mild, has led to its international popularity. - See more at: http://www.asiagocheese.it/en/cheese/history-of-asiago/#sthash.NaNaHKAa.dpuf

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Wine & Food of the Giro 2015 Stage 11: Castelluccio Le More & Lasagna Bolognese

Forlì - Imola (Autodromo Ferrari)147 KM - Medium Mountain

Imola is a town and comune in the province of Bologna, located on the Santerno River. The town is considered the western entrance to the historical region Romagna. 
The Autodromo is an auto racing track. I'd say more, but to be honest, I know nothing about auto racing. Commentators at Podium Cafe recommend a documentary on Ayrton Senna to learn more about the sport and one of its greatest racers, who was killed in a crash at Imola. Google does tell me that the track hosted Grand Prix events until 2006,and now features regular car and bike events. The finishing straight of today's stage is on the motor circuit.


The stage: It wouldn't be a Giro without polemica! As mentioned at the end of yesterday's post, Richie Porte and Simon Clarke both ended up penalized two minutes for the wheel change yesterday. That may be the end of Porte's hopes for a Giro win. Lots more here and here and here and here
Back out on the road, it is raining. The break of the day contained Carlos Betancur, Matteo Montaguti, Franco Pellizotti, Diego Rosa, Marek Rutkiewicz, Beñat Intxausti, Ruben Fernandez, Ryder Hesjedal, Ilnur Zakarin and, once again, Steven Kruijswijk. With about eighty kilometers to go, they had about 3:30 over the main peloton.
Seventy kilometers to go and there was a split in the peloton. Sixty kilometers to go and the gap was down to just over two minutes. The main peloton was down to fifty riders. BMC was spending a lot of time on the front of the peloton. Apparently Gilbert has targeted today's stage. Forty five kilometers and the gap was already under one minute. Attacks from within the break pushed that gap back out over a minute and reduced the group leaving Rosa, Kruijswijk, Intxausti, Zakarin, Betancur, Hesjedal and Pellizotti ahead. With twenty five kilometers to go, their gap was 1:30.
Fifteen kilometers to go and Uran crashed. He was quickly up and chasing, flying by his teammates who had slowed to help. He would make it back.
 

Up front, Zakarin was solo in the lead. With ten kilometers to go, he had 1:30 over the main group and nearly a minute over the break. 


I couldn't resist. 
6.5 kilometers to go and Contador attacked. He would be caught, but that woke up the peloton. Ahead, Zakarin would hold on. 

Stage: Ilnur Zakarin 


GC: 

1 Alberto CONTADOR VELASCO Spain TCS 33 46:54:19
2 Fabio ARU Italy AST 25 +3
3 Mikel LANDA MEANA Spain AST 26 +46
4 Dario CATALDO Italy AST 30 +1:16
5 Roman KREUZIGER Czech Republic TCS 29 +1:46
6 Rigoberto URAN URAN Colombia EQS 28 +2:10
7 Giovanni VISCONTI Italy MOV 32 +2:12
8 Damiano CARUSO Italy BMC 28 +2:20
9 Andrey AMADOR BAKKAZAKOVA Costa Rica MOV 29 +2:24
10 Leopold KONIG Czech Republic SKY 28 +2:30




Wine: Castelluccio Sangiovese di Romagna Le More
Sample from Winebow 
SRP $15.00

From the importer: Owned by the renowned oenologist Vittorio Fiore, Castelluccio was originally founded in the 1970s. In the 1980s Vittorio Fiore became the consulting winemaker and in 1999 he purchased the majority of shares in the property.

Castelluccio is nestled in the Modigliana Hills, between the two towns of Faenza and Forlì, at an altitude range of 750 - 1500 feet above sea level. The territory is known as Emilia Romagna and was part of Tuscany until the 1930s. Castelluccio extends approximately 150 acres, with 36 acres of vineyards and 6 acres with olive trees. The soil is compact layered marl and limestone, the location is composed of micro-areas called “ronchi”, referring to the rock formations that protrude from the mountain side, and render a very high quality of grapes. Sangiovese di Romagna, Cabernet Sauvignon and Sauvignon Blanc are the main grape varieties grown at Castelluccio. Sangiovese di Romagna is indigenous and expresses perfectly the character of the terroir and is a central grape to some of the world’s greatest wines.

The heart of Castelluccio’s philosophy is to respect and interpret the characteristics of “Romagna.” An ideal location near both the Adriatic Sea and the Apennine Mountains, it is recognized as a micro-zone for Sangiovese di Romagna as well as being the only DOC named after the ubiquitous grape. The notable uniqueness in terroir contributes greatly to the expression of the varietal. The elite members of the Castelluccio Estate team make every effort to produce wines that reflect its uniqueness. The outcome is wine that compares flawlessly to the Sangiovese grapes being grown in areas of Tuscany just on the other side of the Apennines Mountain.

"Le More" refers to the blackberry character of this deep and lively Sangiovese di Romagna. The grapes are harvested from the end of September to mid-October, then fermented and aged in stainless steel in order to retain the fresh and fruity character of the wine.

I say: Prettiest label of the Giro for a pretty wine. Easy to drink. Berries and acid, with hints of earth. One of those bottles that empties quickly.
Food: Lasagna Bolognese
A friend wanted lasagne, so lasagna I did make.  
In this case, in a style of Emilia-Romagna. What that means is instead of mozzarella or ricotta or tomato sauce, the layers consisted of noodles, Bolognese sauce, a bechamel and grated parmesan. 

This recipe from Giuliano Hazan was my guide. The top ends up brown and slightly crispy, which may be a surprise to those used to a cheesier or more tomato heavy version.

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Wine & Food of the Giro 2015 Stage 10: Lusenti Malvasia “Bianca Regina” & Bolognese Sauce



Civitanova Marche - Forlì 195 KM

Civitanova Marche is a comune in the Province of Macerata in the Italian region Marche. The tourist website tells me that "This appealing seaside resort also doubles as a colorful fishing port and centre for the footwear industry. And its long, deep gravel beach offers a bit more style than its nearby neighbours with no shortage of hotels to choose from down on the seafront." 

Forlì is a city in Emilia-Romagna and is the capital of the province of Forlì-Cesena. It is the central city of Romagna. Encyclopedia Britannica tells me that "Known to the Romans as Forum Livii, it is said to have been founded by the consul Livius Salinator in the 2nd century bc. As a 12th-century commune, it was in league with Ravenna, and in the 13th century it was the seat of the imperial court of Romagna province. Ruled by the Ordelaffi family from 1315, Forlì was taken by Cesare Borgia, the cardinal and military leader, in 1500 and annexed to the Papal States in 1504. It became part of the Kingdom of Italy in 1860." 
You can go on a culinary tour of the region with my friend Sean. Go! More info here.  

The stage:  A sprint stage after the rest day. Which means a likely to be doomed break that will be caught close to the finish. The expectation is of little action followed by a few minutes of excitement at the finish. But we shall see.

The breakaway riders: Boem, Busato, Gatto, Malaguti and Marangoni. A look at the current jersey wearers:  https://twitter.com/giroditalia/status/600644337454731264/photo/1

Indeed, a quiet day on the road and I was researching Tour de France wine options. With this year's route, there may be a lot of beer, cider and other alcohols for the first week of the race. Suggestions very welcome. 

Meanwhile, back on the road:   

An abandonment: Matteo Pelucchi. Thirty kilometers to go and the gap was still hovering around 2:30. With seventeen kilometers to go, the gap was just under two minutes with Lotto Soudal on the front. The peloton was cutting it close. A mechanical for Gatto. Cue angry cat jokes. Ten kilometers to go and the gap was still 1:30. The peloton may have gotten this one wrong. Six kilometers to go and it was still over one minute. Behind, a mechanical for Richie Porte. Time for a Sky team trial to catch up.

 

Ahead, attacking from the break Marangoni.  But it would be Boem with the stage win. But more importantly, forty seconds lost on the day for Richie Porte. 


Stage:
Nicola Boem 

GC: 

And then things got even more interesting after the stage: 




More to come for sure. New gc: http://www.gazzetta.it/Giroditalia/2015/en/stage/10/standings/


Wine:  Lusenti Malvasia “Bianca Regina”

http://www.lusentivini.com/

From the producer:
Designation: Colli Piacentini DOC (Controlled Designation of Origin)
Wine style: Late harvest dry white
Grape variety: 100% Malvasia di Candia Aromatica
Production area: Ziano (PC) – near Pozzolo Piccolo – Southwestern exposure
Vinification, ageing and maturation: The grapes are selected and harvested in crates; after crushing-destemming, the must is left in contact with the skins for three or four days at low temperatures. After gentle pressing, the must is racked into small wooden casks, where it remains for 9 months. After blending and bottling, the wine matures in the cellar for at least 9 months.
Alcohol content: 14% vol.
Colour: Pale straw yellow
Food matching: Strong and slightly matured cheeses, ravioli with pumpkin filling, curried white meat, Vicenza-style dried cod.

I say: Well aren't we fun. I guess it has been a while since I have had an orange wine. Golden copper. Rich apricot, lemon and orange peel with some nuttiness.
   
Food: Bolognese sauce
Really, I should have made piadina. The Punk Domestics culinary tour that I mentioned above can teach you that. Here is the write-up from a previous trip. 

But the race is only in the region for a short time and I could not resist a Bolognese sauce. It will reappear tomorrow as a component in lasagne.

Like many, I make my Bolognese based on the classic Marcella Hazan recipe, though I have been known to change it up slightly based on what I have on hand. In this case, it was two parts pork to one part beef. The real key for this recipe though is cooking low and slow. You repeatedly add liquid to your meat and vegetable base and cook at a very low temperature until it is almost dry. In my case, that meant six or so hours of cooking time, though most of it is hands off.

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Wine & Food of the Giro 2015 Stage 9: Montevetrano Core & Mozzarella di Bufala





Benevento - san Giorgio del Sannio 212 KM - Medium mountain

Benevento is a city of Campania, capital of the province of Benevento, fifty kilometres northeast of Naples. The former capital of the formidable Samnites fell to the Romans in 321 BC and changed its name from Malaventum to Beneventum. The seat of a Lombard duchy, then subsequently a powerful principality, the town was the site of the famous Battle of Benevento, in which Charles of Anjou defeated King Manfred and became the new King of Sicily.  

San Giorgio del Sannio is a comune in the Province of Benevento in Campania, located about sixty kilometers northeast of Naples. You can always check out La Gazetta's official Giro site for more info on these stages. Today's tourist info here.

The stage: This could be interesting.


Our break of the day in pictures:
 

Off the road, at least Colli has kept his sense of humor, after his horrible injury:
 

On the road, a neutralised section for the peloton, as a moto has crashed on the descent. Ahead, the break was able to gain more time. Tom Slagter remained out front alone. with 57 kilometers to go, he had 1:45 to the chasers. 


With forty kilometers to go, as to be expected, attacks started from within the break group. With thirty five kilometers to go, the gap to Slagter was 5:45. 


A much quieter day so far than predicted. With twenty five kilometers to go, Slagter still had 1:43. Attacks again from the break behind, but they did not seem to be making progress. With fourteen kilometers to go, the maglia rosa group was at 3:49. Thirteen kilometers to go and a dig from Aru. Contador followed with Porte and Landa. Uran has been distanced. Ahead, Tiralongo caught Slagter with about ten kilometers to go. They had just over a minute to the maglia rosa group behind. 
 

Just over four kilometers to go and Tiralongo had taken the solo lead. He would hold on for the stage win. Behind, after the remaining breakaway riders made it in, Aru picked up a second or two with a sprint to the line.

Stage: Paolo Tiralongo
 

GC: Alberto Contador



Wine: Montevetrano Core Campania IGT 2012
Sample from Winebow SRP $ 25.00

From the importer
Proprietress Silvia Imparato indulged in wine as a hobby until she decided to rebuild her family’s vineyards in Montevetrano, in the oft-underestimated region of Campania. She employed the skills of highly regarded winemaker Riccardo Cotarella and they have created an outstanding icon wine they decided to name Montevetrano. 
Montevetrano is a small zone in the hills near the commune of San Cipriano Picentino, not far from Salerno. Mountains surround the property, with the vineyards situated on gentle slopes facing south by southwest. The heart of the estate is a beautiful, ancient villa. In the first years of production the basement of the villa also served as the cellar. Now the wine is made and stored in a new modern cellar, built in 2000. Silvia and her friends use the old cellar for private vintages. Within a very short period of time her work with Cotarella has produced an absolute jewel in this location.

Core (pronounced Kor-Ay) is local dialect for “heart”, and the label (once again designed by the daughter of proprietress Silvia Imparato) evokes the love of life, and wine that is the spirit of Montevetrano.  Core is sourced from particular experimental Aglianico plots on the estate in San Cipriano and also from outside growers in the classical Benevento area who are working closely with Riccardo Cotarella. 

I sayDark fruits, licorice and earth. 
More on the wines of the region here, from the New York Times. 


Food: Mozzarella di Bufala
More cheese!
There is an excellent San Francisco Chronicle write up of Mozzarella di Bufala here. Among other things, it tells us that "A relative of the North American buffalo, water buffalo have thrived in the marshes and bogs around Naples for centuries. Locals have been making cheese with the milk since at least the 12th century, although we have no clue what that cheese might have been like. But by the late 1700s, southern Italians enjoyed mozzarella similar to what we know today.
Mozzarella di bufala received DOP (protected-origin) status in 1996, restricting the areas where it can be produced to seven provinces, or parts of them, around Naples."
What to do with it? Eat in a Caprese salad, use on pizza, use on a tomato panini?